Master Repair Plumbing
Dallas-FortWorth Plumber Since 1983
(817) 338-0000
601 Riverside Dr Fort Worth, Texas, 76111 United States
masterrepairplumbing@gmail.com

Leaky pipes happen. Some might erringly attribute them to the third law of Thermodynamics.

But most of the time, leaky pipes have nothing to do with thermodynamics. Things just wear out eventually.

Sealants break down. Pipes corrode. Things clog up. These things happen. And if you’re a homeowner, statistically you are going to encounter a leaky pipe at some point.

These things happen. And if you’re a homeowner, statistically you are going to encounter a leaky pipe at some point.

You’ll want to get on those leaks as soon as possible. According to the EPA, the average household’s leaks can account for more than 10,000 gallons of wasted water (That’s a lot).

Most people call the plumber for the simplest of pipe repair. And that’s ok, it’s what keeps plumbers in business. But sometimes you just don’t have the cash to spare on service. And that’s ok too.

But sometimes you just don’t have the cash to spare on service. And that’s ok too.

Doing basic pipe repair yourself doesn’t have to be as complicated as disarming a bomb. And we’ve got the tips to help you repair your pipes on your own.

And we’ve got the tips to help you repair your pipes on your own.

1. Find The Leak

Unless you’ve got a gusher, pipe leaks can be difficult to find. Pipes run all over your house, through the walls, under the floor, and out into your yard.

If you’ve found a puddle of water somewhere, and it definitely wasn’t the dog, then move all appliances and valuables away from that spot. Sometimes it’s as simple as a leak from an appliance input.

Washers, dishwashers, and water heaters can be the most common source of your leak.

The other places to look would be around faucets, making another common leakage spot under the sink. Either the inbound pipes or the drain could leak. If you’ve stuffed the area under your sink with stuff

Either the inbound pipes or the drain could leak if you’ve stuffed the area under your sink with stuff.

If you’ve stuffed the area under your sink full, you may not even notice a leak. Move all the junk out from under there and check. If it’s been happening for a while, you’ll notice the bottom of the cabinet has water stains. Sometimes, the bottom of the cabinet will rot and fall out. Take care to find the leak as quickly as you can to avoid this.

Move all the junk out from under there and check. If it’s been happening for a while, you’ll notice the bottom of the cabinet has water stains. Sometimes, the bottom of the cabinet will rot and fall out. Take care to find the leak as quickly as you can to avoid this.

Sometimes, the bottom of the cabinet will rot and fall out. Take care to find the leak as quickly as you can to avoid this.

Showers are another place you should look for a leak. Signs you have a leak in the shower could be persistent mold, loose tiles, peeling paint on the outside of the room, and ceiling stains.

Check the shower for grout leaks. Any holes in your grout could spell trouble. So it may not be a pipe repair problem there, but you should check anyway.

Lastly, if it’s a slab leak, you want to call a professional ASAP to get it repaired. Signs you have a slab leak can include, warmer than normal flooring, low water pressure, and unusual outdoor puddles.

The Test

If you have checked all the visible pipes, there is a way to test if you even have a pipe leak at all. You may not need pipe repair, but roof repair or grout repair might actually be the needed remedy.

Find your water meter.

Mark where the needle is pointing on the meter. You can use a piece of tape or a pencil.

Then leave all faucets, fixtures, and appliances that use water off for eight hours.

Check the meter again. If the needle has moved, then you’ve got a leak somewhere. You may need to call a plumber for pipe repair if you can’t find the leak.

2. DIY Pipe Repair

Now that you’ve found the leak, it’s time to get your hands dirty.

What you’ll need:

  • 200-grain sandpaper
  • plumber’s tape
  • epoxy paste
  • A small wrench
  • Compound Stick (for really small leaks)

Turn It Off

First thing’s first. Find the shut-off valve for whatever is leaking and turn it off.

Remember the old adage: righty-tighty, lefty-loosey. Turning the nob or valve to the right will shut off the water.

If you turn it to the left, you might break the valve depending on your strength. Then you’ll definitely be calling a plumber.

Clean It

You want to make sure that no residue or mold could undo all your hard work. Especially if you are repairing PVC or rubber pipes.

Take a cloth and wipe down the pipe around the leak.

Then take some fine sandpaper and lightly rub the pipe where the leak is. You will have a clean and dry pipe in no time.

Apply Tape

Pipe repair involves plugging up the hole. And unlike sticking your finger in a dam, you actually stop the leak.

Take the tape and put it on the leak. Then wrap.

Keep going until you have several layers. Get the wrap as tight as you can.

The wrap should be several inches on either side of the leak. This will ensure that no leak springs there again.

Seal It

You can get an epoxy paste or glue from your hardware store. With this you can do without the plumber’s tape, but you probably want to double up the pipe repair.

Remember that leaks statistic. You’re attempting to both save yourself money and headaches later.

Make sure the pipe is still dry. Take out the paste and flatten it in your hand. It should be like putty.

Take out the paste and flatten it in your hand. It should be like putty.

Now press it to the leak and flatten it against the pipe. Let it sit for a good 20 minutes.

Tighten It

Loose joints can be another source of leaks. This is where you small wrench come in handy.

Find the leaky joint. Then take your wrench and tighten the bolts. Be careful. Too much force and you break the pipe.

Be careful. Too much force and you break the pipe.

You can combine the tightening and the sealing into one step. Make sure you apply the epoxy on the joint and then tighten.

It turns out that pipe repair is actually quite easy and will save you from calling a costly plumber.

Have any other questions about pipe repair? Let us know in the comments below. And, as always, keep it flowing.

How to Find (and Fix) Plumbing Leaks for Pipe Repair
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